Monday, June 17, 2013

Reflection for the Week - June 17

Since what is real has many dimensions, it needs to be approached from a diversity of angles. Try this direction. Symbols, metaphors, and stories are major pathways for uncovering the real. Don’t leave them out and assume that only what you ‘see’ is real. Each of these paths has the capacity to give more to us than we can give to them. There is a depth and richness in this type of saturated phenomena that surpasses what we see and therefore turns us into the ‘seen by.’ I would wager one of the keys for producing and interacting with these paths is imagination, as it gives us access to and a vision for ‘seeing anew.’ Thus, in discovering the real, we have to be open to the significant role that imagination plays in making what is, what is.

3 comments:

Rhett & Valerie said...

Greg,

Thanks for this. One question that I've been thinking through for some time, and on which I would like to hear your feedback (if you have time): What is the role of the imagination in the education of youth? and how do we cultivate it?

Rhett

Greg said...

Rhett,
Hope you're well. Why aren't you over here, with what seems like everybody else, giving us a lecture?

Good questions. Not sure I have very promising answers. The role of imagination in educating youth (how old?)would perhaps be related to subject matter that could teach a more holistic perspective of life in the world. I guess examples of what is taking place while imagining might be helpful in showing some connection and disconnection between imagination and what is out there. Cultivating could take place through stories, drawings, creativity, and beauty that might be able to make points that can be built on for the future.

Rhett & Valerie said...

Greg,

Valerie and I very frequently talk about when we would be able to get back to L'Abri. Hopefully soon!

One thought that I've had (from the perspective of "Christian" education), and this is not necessarily restricted to youth, is that we need to provide students with a fuller vision of the redemptive drama as provided in the Scriptures, and to cultivate their abilities to think deeply about how they participate in and contribute to the outworking of it. However, stories, drawings, creative development, etc., I think, are also a pivotal part of this, as they are capable of illuminating aspects of the world, self, and divine drama in unique ways, revealing truth and uncovering redemptive possibilities we didn't see before.

Rhett