Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Mourning? - December 18

Why are we mourning the deaths of children and adults in Connecticut? The tremendous outpouring of sadness over the senseless killings in Newtown is striking. No doubt what took place in this quiet little city was a catastrophe of the highest order. Yet, and here’s the point, thousands of young children, teachers, and parents die daily from incurable diseases, lack of available organs for transplants, or healthy at birth. Death brings about devastating separation, annihilates present relationality, and deprives here and now loving and being loved. On this account, mourning ought to be an ongoing part of our lives, not a cell phone or sound bite media moment concerning horrific tragedies like the Sandy Hook Elementary massacre. Are we mourning? Yes, and we should always be, but still, there is more; so much more.

3 comments:

Sisyphos said...

Hi,

first one I have seen who has said this. It is a tragedy as you say but it is also a feast - for the press and ourselves. Oh, God, oh my, but if we meant it we would have to cry over all those other children. Why did no statesman stand up at some point and grief over them? We are accustomed to it. But this is no excuse. If we cry over those kids in Conneticut because we think this is wrong then we ought to cry over all of them. Or become numb to all of it and state that we do not care. The Pharasees prayed at the corner of the street. We cry at the corners of the streets and I boast in a corner of the Internet.

Sisyphos said...

I assume the implicit reasoning in justifying the reasoning of mourning those explicitly goes something like this: we could have prevented it easily with a law. It seems to be more in our hands than the anonymous dying of so many of them.

Greg said...

Sisyphos,
Thanks. Yes. I believe there are plenty of horrific things happening that are not as sensationalized as this tragedy. We can only be aware of so much, but being informed is not simply paying attention when the sensational or unexpected, as awful as it may be, happens.