Thursday, November 19, 2009

The ZigZag Café

We will be convening here at the ZigZag café, Suisse, on Thursdays for conversation and dialogue. I invite you to stop by every Thursday for the question of the day. Your thoughts and participation are most welcome. Pull up a stool, avec un café, un thé, ou un chocolat chaud, et un croissant, and join in here on Thursday at the ZZ café.

For today:

Do you think our natural desires for acceptance, validation, and significance are obstacles for living spirituality and being true selves?

4 comments:

Lukas und Céline Kuhs said...

Yes, I think so.

We are accepted by God, he made us significant...
But we want more...
I count it towards the body of this death, who makes some problems. This hinders me in living in love to other and God. Because it urges me to love myself and to do everything for my own validation/acceptance/significance.

Lukas

Greg said...

Lukas,
Thanks. Do you think that these natural desires could be pointers to God, but that it's how we view them that may be a potential problem?

Lukas und Céline Kuhs said...

I suspect our view not to be correct on many things. I assume "but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind" to teach me, that I need to learn. Anyway, "Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God; that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God.", at least to some extent, a restored sight has been given to us.

Are those pointers to God? How should one know? For me they are rather pointers to me, not to God. But this might be caused by my destroyed sight...

Greg said...

Lukas,
Seems to me though that in fact our view can often be correct. A natural desire for acceptance may be God given. Should that be the case, it would be normal to want to be accepted. Maybe it's what we do to be accepted that is potentially inappropriate or even sinful. If we put ourselves first in a selfish way, we go too far, but if we don't and keep the desire to be accepted within normal limits, then I wouldn't see it as a problem, but a part of being human, which points to God.

Well, destroyed sight is indeed blindness, but I think that we can see clearly enough some facets of being human in the world as pointing to God.